Introduction to Rest with Examples – Part 2


In the previous post, we talked about what is REST APIs and discussed a few examples, we particularly, used CURL for our requests. So far, we have established that a request is composed of four parts: endpoint, method, header, and data. We have already explained endpoint and method, now let’s go over the header, data, and some more relevant information on the subject.

Headers

Headers offer information to the server and the client. They are used for a wide range of use cases, such as offering a peek into the body content or for authentication. Typically, HTTP headers follow the property-value pair format; a colon separates them. For instance, the following example consists of a header which informs the server about expecting JSON-based content.

“Content-Type: application/json”. Missing the opening”

By using cURL (we talked about it in the last post), you can use the –header option for sending the HTTP headers. For instance, if you want to send the above-mentioned header, then for the Github API, you can write the following.

curl -H “Content-Type: application/json” https://api.github.com

In order to check all of your sent headers, you can use the –verbose or the –v option at the end of the request. Consider the following command as an example.

Keep in mind that in your result, “*” indicates cURL’s additional information, “<” indicates the response headers and “>” indicates the request headers.

The Data (Body)

Let’s come to the final component of a request, also known as the message or the body. It entails information that is to be sent to any server. To use cURL for sending data, you can use the –data or the –d options like the following format.

For multiple fields, you can write the following .i.e. add two –d options.

It is also possible to break requests into several lines for better readability. When you learn how to spin (start) servers, you can easily create your API and test it with any data. If you are not interested in spinning up a server, you can use Requestbin.com and hit the “create endpoint”. In response, you can get a request which can be used for testing requests. In order to test requests, you have to generate your own request bin. Keep in mind that these request bins have a lifespan of 48 hours. Now you can transfer data to your request bin by using the following.

curl -X POST https://requestb.in/1ix963n1 \

-d name=adam \

-d age=28

cURL’s data transfer is similar to a web page’s form fields. For JSON data, you can alter your “Content-Type” and change it to “application/json”, like this.

curl -X POST https://requestb.in/1ix963n1 \

-H “Content-Type: application/json” \

-d ‘{

“adam”:”value”

“age”:”28”

}’

And with this, your request’s anatomy is finished.

Authentication

While using POST requests with your Github API, a message displays “Requires authentication”. What does this mean exactly?

Developers ensure that there are certain authorization measures so specific actions are only performed by the right parties; this negates the possibilities of impersonation by any malicious third party. PUT, PATCH, DELETE, and POST requests change the database, forcing the developers to design some sort of authentication mechanism. What about the GET request? It also needs authentication but only in some cases.

In the world of web, authentication is performed in two ways. Firstly, there is the generic user/password authentication—known as the basic authentication. Secondly, authentication is done by a secret token. The second method consists of something known as oAuth—it uses Google, Facebook, and other social media platforms for user authentication. For using the user/password authentication, you have to use the “-u” option like the following.

You can test this authentication yourself. Afterward, the previous “requires authentication” response is changed to “Problems parsing JSON”. The reason behind this is that so far, you have not sent any data. Since it is a POST request, data transfer is a must.

HTTP Error Messages and Status Codes

The above-mentioned messages like “Problems parsing JSON” or “Requires authentication” fall into the category of HTTP error messages. These emerge whenever a request has an issue. With HTTP status codes, you can learn your response status instantly. The range of these codes starts from 100+ and end to 500+.

  • The success of your request is signified by 200+.
  • The redirection of the request to any URL is signified by the 300+.
  • If the client causes an error, then the code is 400+.
  • If the server causes an error, then the code is 500+.

In order to debug a response’s status, you can use the head or verbose options. For instance, if you add “-I” in a POST request and do not mention the username/password details, then it can cause a 401 status code. When your request is flawed—either due to incorrect or missing data, a 400 status code appears.

Versions of APIs

Time and again, developers upgrade their APIs, it is a life-long process. When too many modifications are required, the developers should consider creating a new version. When this occurs, it is possible that your application gets an error; due to the fact that you wrote code with respect to the previous version API while the brand-new API is pointed out by your requests.

In order to perform a request for a certain version of the API, there are two methods. Depending on your API’s structure, you can choose any of them.

  • Use endpoint.
  • Use the request header.

For instance, Twitter follows the first strategy. For instance, a website can follow it in this way:

https://api.abc.com/1.1/account/settings.json

On the other hand, Github takes advantage of the second method. For instance, consider the following where the API version is 4 as mentioned in the request header.

curl https://api.abc.com -H Accept:application/abc.v4+json

 

 

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